Costco is Way More Fun this Way

It’s always fun for Seth to be with his cousins, and yesterday we had the privilege of grocery shopping with Aunt Sarah and baby Gideon. I pushed the cart with the boys and Sarah had the food cart.

Seth sat happily in front, looking all around, while Gideon smiled and cooed to the back of Seth’s head from his car seat.

I had my list on my phone (Trello) and added costs to the items I usually buy as we went along, which helped me keep an eye on my end total. 😳 Sarah and I even decided we would split certain groceries later too which was nice.

Both the boys eventually got ridiculously tired and crying ensued till they both crashed on the way home.

Even though outings can be faster with just Seth and me, I’m happy any time I get spend time with my sister.

Using Trello for Task Management: Organize, Accomplish, and Celebrate

Without organization, my mind is completely counterproductive in a day. It reels with all my mental to-do’s, as I compete to finish tasks before I forget them. All the while, I’m adding more things to the list.

Although I may think I’m performing at 100% and the “get it done now” is a wonderful attitude, I end up exhausted, fretting about the following day, and forget to notice what I did complete; and then my husband comes home to this…

So instead, I use Trello. Trello is a free app that uses Boards, Lists, and Cards to document and organize task management and workflows.

Clear the Mind:

I have the flexibility to quickly add items to cards in my To-Do list from my phone or computer, keeping my head clear and focused.

Organize the Day:

I organize the cards by how I want to accomplish them, top to bottom. Note: I put the tasks that may just require 5 minutes, but I’d tend to put off, near the top.

Don’t Forget to Celebrate:

I also have a list, titled “Done”, so I can see what I’ve accomplished in a day. My mind is rejuvenated each time I see what I did complete, and I feel unencumbered, knowing exactly what awaits me in the to-do list tomorrow.

Here’s a sample of mine this week:

It’s easy to create more lists as needed, such as “Dinners This Week” or “Blocked Tasks”. I feel that organization is really adaptable; how each person needs to visualize a list of tasks differs, so if needed, create more lists easily, such as “Dinners this Week”, “Blocked Tasks”, or “Reoccurring Tasks”.

Within the cards, additional tasks, steps, or checklist items can be created, as shown below.

But go ahead and try it for yourself. Maybe you’ll find it helpful or maybe you’re a strictly post-it’s and pen & paper type of person. In any case, it’s about whatever helps get the job done, with as little headache as possible.